“Wilderness Canoe Country: Minnesota’s Greatest Recreational Asset”

By Sigurd F. Olson published in Naturalist, 1967 The Value of Wilderness The wilderness canoe country is northern Minnesota’s greatest recreational asset. Outside of its beauty, uniqueness, historical significance and fishing, it has a quality that other lake and forest areas do not possess, its primitive character. This is the magnet that draws people, the fact that here alone […]

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Preserving Listening Point

You can help preserve this historical site! The passage of time and the weathering effects of the elements are taking their toll on the Listening Point structures. In 2009 Sig’s cedar dock needed to be replaced. Last year we restored the cabin’s iconic stone steps and a section of the fireplace hearth. In addition, the entire stone […]

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Wild Islands of the Shield

by Sigurd F. Olson One day in the Far North we fought a gale on Black Bear Lake of the Churchill River in Saskatchewan. It was a glorious sunny day and along the muskegs the air was alive with the screaming of gulls and terns, a day that made up for the drenching storms, treacherous rapids, and portages we […]

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Listening Point Named to National Historic Registry in 2007

This article was published in the Summer 2008 Listening Point Foundation newsletter. By Kevin Proescholdt It’s official: Listening Point, the land and cabin on Burntside Lake near Ely that provided respite and inspiration for conservationist and author Sigurd F. Olson, has been named to the National Register of Historic Places. “We are delighted by this official recognition of the importance of both Sigurd […]

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Pagami Creek Fire 9-11-2011

What Would Sig Say About the Pagami Creek Fire?

I’m sure we all wonder how Sig would respond to a major event like the Pagami Creek forest fire. Back in the 1970s, Bud Heinselman was finishing up on his monumental fire history research in the BWCAW. He and Sig collaborated often then because of the upcomign 1978 legislation. Bud, undoubtedly, would not pass up an opportunity to discuss his work […]

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tree_ring

Tree Rings Tell BWCA Story

Isn’t it interesting that the original work of Bud Heinselman and Sig Olson lives on today? Their passion to understand the boreal forest and promote wilderness values is stimulating new studies with new technology. Bud and Sig were brothers in this search for knowledge. They both made huge contributions to their respective fields. But perhaps more importantly, they both knew intimately the […]

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Sig as Scientist: Fish-Eating Deer

The following short article by Sigurd Olson marked his first piece published in any of the scientific journals. It was published more as what we might now call a “Note” in one of the scientific journals rather than as a full article with citations and footnotes. Nonetheless, Sig’s article documented an unusual biological phenomenon based […]

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